Global Bioeconomy Alliance
Leading research and education for worldwide bioeconomy

About

The idea of the Global Bioeconomy Alliance is the installation of a strong network of universities all over the world, which are leading in the field of bioeconomy. The intension is to strengthen the cooperation in research and teaching by workshops, common projects as well as staff exchange to transfer knowledge and expertise. The strong nucleus will be composed off the Technical University of Munich (Germany), the University of Queensland (Australia) and the Universidade Estadual Paulista (Brazil), which are top-level universities of these countries, and have a strong expertise in research connected to bioeconomy aspects.

The focus of the alliance is to strengthen the external impact of research and teaching in the field of bioeconomy and to create a brand for this global network. Further partners all over the world will be welcome to strengthen the alliance and participate in the realization of a global bioeconomy and biobased industry.

The idea behind this international network is the fact that bioeconomy is a global topic and can only be realized by combining all agricultural, technical as well as social aspects of the biobased industry and society as present at the different locations of our planet. This alliance intends to transfer knowledge and technologies to avoid mistakes and failures in bioeconomy approaches and to boost the global bioeconomy. For this, the founding partner universities are located in areas with different levels of implementation of a bioeconomy and will influence and inspire the other partners by their experience as well as local needs and challenges. All three partner countries show different feedstock supplies and will face diverse challenges and issues.

Next to workshops and personal exchanges, the aim of the alliance is to acquire funding in the field of bioeconomy to work on common and specific challenges of the partner countries.

Under the umbrella of the Global Bioeconomy Alliance we will built up a strong and permanently growing network of experts, which all commit to collaborate in research and teaching in fields closely related to bioeconomy and to develop strategies for global problem solving.

Events & News

2020-03-17

Save the date

Key Technologies in the Bioeconomy - A Global Bioeconomy Alliance Conference

The conference will be held in Straubing this year: 2022-09-27 – 2022-09-29

2021-12-08

TUM São Paulo Dialogue: The Future of Food – Insights from the Global Bioeconomy Alliance

You are invited to join leading global experts for a webinar discussing the Future of Food. Hosted by the TUM São Paulo office, esteemed researchers from the Global Bioeconomy Alliance will explore a return to the origins of food.

2019-07-10

3rd Global Alliance on Bioeconomy Symposium kicks off at UNESP

Approximately 90 researchers from Brazil, Germany and Australia attended the UNESP’s University Council auditorium on September 30th for the opening of the 3rd Global Alliance on Bioeconomy Symposium.

2019-01-31

Consul General of India visits TUM Campus Straubing

The Consul General of India, Sugandh Rajaram, has visited the TUM Campus Straubing to discuss about potential cooperations with India in the field of bioeconomy. With the planned extension of the Global Bioeconomy Alliance to include partners from the different world regions possible Indian universities were evaluated and next measures assessed.

2019-01-22

UNESP, UQ and TUM jointly feature Global Bioeconomy Alliance at AIEA Conference in San Francisco

This year’s AIEA Annual Conference took place under the topic What's Next? Possibilities and Probabilities in the Future of International Higher Education.

2018-12-17

BAYLAT/FAPESP funding for two scientific workshops in the field of global bioeconomy

In July 2018 the Bavarian State Ministry of Science and the Arts (StMWK), represented by the Bavarian University Centre for Latin America (BAYLAT) and FAPESP have opened a call for common workshops between Bavarian researchers and researchers of the Brazilian State of São Paulo.

2018-06-21

Memorandum of Understanding signed

Global bioeconomy is the subject of a trilateral agreement which was signed in June 2018 between the Australian University of Queensland (UQ), the Brazilian Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP) and the TUM.

2018-06-18

Symposium „Natural Products: Analytics, Biodiversity and Biochemistry“

On the 18th – 21th of June 2018 a research symposium was held at TUM bringing together colleagues from UNESP (Brazil), the University of Queensland (Australia) and TUM, including one day at the TUM Munich Headquarter, which was dedicated to present funding opportunities from German organizations.

2018-03-23

TUM São Paulo: TUM expands cooperation in Brazil during anniversary year

2018 marks the 150th anniversary of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and it is not only celebrated in Munich and Bavaria, but on international level as well

2018-03-09

Workshop Estratégico CTBE “Renewable Resources”

The workshop “Renewable Resources” on 9th of March, 2018 in Campinas, Brazil dealt with biocatalytic, fermentative, chemo- and electro-catalytic processes for a sustainable production of chemicals as well as with possibilities of cooperation between Brazil and Germany.

2018-03-05

Coordination Talk “Global Bioeconomy Alliance”

On 5th of March, 2018 representatives of TUM and UNESP discussed at UNESP (São Paulo, Brazil) the further procedure regarding the establishment of the Global Bioeconomy Alliance.

2017-10-04

UQ-TUM Bioeconomy Symposium “The Impact of Biotechnology on the Economy of the Future”

International academics, researchers, and government representatives met from 4th to 6th of October, 2017 at UQ (Brisbane, Australia) to explore the role of biotechnology on future economies.

2017-07-04

Coordination Talk “International Cooperation in Education”

On 4th of July, 2017 a delegation from the Australian UQ came to TUM Campus Straubing for Biotechnology and Sustainability, Germany to initiate an international cooperation in teaching regarding the new course "Chemical Biotechnology".

2017-06-19

“Research Symposium on Biotechnology for Food and Chemicals”

Researchers from UQ recently returned from Germany, where they explored the future of biotechnology with some of Europe’s leading scientists.

2015-06-11

Symposium “Water, Environment and Sustainability”

The aim of the symposium, held on 11th to 12th of June, 2015 at TUM (Munich, Germany) was to bring together scientists and students from UQ and TUM, who are engaged in identifying solutions to significant global challenges such as sustainable production of food, chemicals, materials and energy in the light of dwindling resources.

Partners

Technical University of Munich (TUM), Germany

The Technical University of Munich was founded in 1868 as a center of learning dedicated to the natural sciences. Today TUM is one of Europe’s top universities. It is committed to excellence in research and teaching, interdisciplinary education and the active promotion of promising young scientists. The university also forges strong links with companies and scientific institutions across the world. With 14 departments, 6 Integrative Research Centers, 545 professors and 10,000 staff members TUM provides an excellent environment for research and for the education of 41,000 students in 177 degree programs.

At TUM, bioeconomy was concentrated in 2017 at „TUM Campus Straubing for Biotechnology and Sustainability (TUMCS)“. This sixth Integrative Research Center conducts fundamental research and technological developments on biogenic resources, biotechnology and bioeconomy. Research focuses are the chemical and energetic use of biogenic resources as well as its economic aspects. Additionally to PhD studies, at TUMCS the academic education takes place within the Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs Biogenic Materials, Bioeconomy, Biomass Technology, Chemical Biotechnology, Sustainable Management & Technology and Technology of Biogenic Resources.

University of Queensland (UQ), Australia

For more than a century, The University of Queensland (UQ) has created positive change for society by delivering knowledge leadership for a better world.

UQ ranks among the world’s top universities and, with a strong focus on teaching excellence, UQ has won more national teaching awards than any other Australian university.

At UQ, we’re changing the way higher education is imagined and experienced. Our students enjoy innovative and flexible learning options, diverse and dynamic partnership opportunities, and an integrated digital and campus learning environment.

UQ’s 307,000 graduates are an engaged network of global alumni spanning more than 170 countries, and include more than 15,800 PhDs. More than 56,000 current students, including around 20,000 postgraduate students and approximately 21,000 international students from 142 countries, currently study across UQ’s three campuses in South East Queensland.

With a strong focus on teaching excellence, having won more national teaching awards than any other Australian university, UQ is committed to providing students with the best opportunities and practical experiences during their time with us, empowering them with transferable knowledge and skills that will prepare them to exceed expectations throughout their careers.

UQ’s six faculties, eight globally recognised research institutes and more than 100 research centres attract an interdisciplinary community of 1,500 scientists, social scientists and engineers, who champion research excellence and continue UQ’s tradition of research leadership. This is reflected in UQ being the number one recipient of Australian Research Council Fellowships and Awards nationally across all scheme years (452 awards worth $339 million).

UQ has an outstanding track record in commercialising innovation, with major technologies employed across the globe and gross product sales of more than US$44 billion.

Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp), Brazil

UNESP was established in 1976 and is one of the largest and most prestigious research-intensive universities in Brazil. The institution offers free education and is committed to excellence in teaching, research and community engagement.

It has a distinctive structure, with schools and institutes located in 24 cities in the state of São Paulo, being one of the most successful multi-campus universities in the world. About 3.500 academics and 7.000 non-academic staff contribute to the development of the institution that counts with about 36.000 undergraduate and 15.000 graduate students.

The university awards more than 1.200 Ph.D. diplomas per year and is responsible for about 8% of all Brazilian scientific publication. In the last five years, almost 31.000 scientific papers were published by university’s researchers. The institution’s research priorities are Healthy Societies, Transformative Technologies, One Health, Feeding the World, Biosphere, and Bioeconomy.

The institution’s permanent social engagement through different initiatives, the high employability rates among alumni and its top ten position in the most prominent Latin America rankings among other relevant features, reinforce UNESP’s reputation as one of the best institutions in the region.

Research

All partners of the Global Bioeconomy Alliance conduct intensive research in the field of bioeconomy. The following sites give an overview of the fields of interest at TUMCS, UQ and UNESP.

One of the alliance’s main objectives for the near future is to intensify common research between the partner universities.

Scientists at the TUM Campus Straubing conduct basic research and technological developments on biogenic resources. This applies both to their material use, for example in the chemical industry, and to their energetic use. A further research field is the development of strategies for the sustainable and environmentally compatible supply of biogenic resources. In addition, the economic aspects surrounding the production and marketing of biogenic resources are examined. A particular strength of the TUM Campus Straubing is its cross-industry and cross-disciplinary approach, in which the various disciplines work closely together. These include the natural, engineering, ecosystem and economic sciences in order to comprehensively cover questions ranging from molecules to the marketing of biogenic resources. Main fields of research interest are:

  • Biogenic Materials
  • Biotechnology
  • Renewable Energy
  • Sustainable Chemicals & Processes
  • Economics

For more than a century, The University of Queensland (UQ) has created positive change for society by delivering knowledge leadership for a better world.

UQ ranks among the world’s top universities and, with a strong focus on teaching excellence, UQ has won more national teaching awards than any other Australian university.

At UQ, we’re changing the way higher education is imagined and experienced. Our students enjoy innovative and flexible learning options, diverse and dynamic partnership opportunities, and an integrated digital and campus learning environment.

UQ’s 307,000 graduates are an engaged network of global alumni spanning more than 170 countries, and include more than 15,800 PhDs. More than 56,000 current students, including around 20,000 postgraduate students and approximately 21,000 international students from 142 countries, currently study across UQ’s three campuses in South East Queensland.

With a strong focus on teaching excellence, having won more national teaching awards than any other Australian university, UQ is committed to providing students with the best opportunities and practical experiences during their time with us, empowering them with transferable knowledge and skills that will prepare them to exceed expectations throughout their careers.

UQ’s six faculties, eight globally recognised research institutes and more than 100 research centres attract an interdisciplinary community of 1,500 scientists, social scientists and engineers, who champion research excellence and continue UQ’s tradition of research leadership. This is reflected in UQ being the number one recipient of Australian Research Council Fellowships and Awards nationally across all scheme years (452 awards worth $339 million).

UQ has an outstanding track record in commercialising innovation, with major technologies employed across the globe and gross product sales of more than US$44 billion.

More information:

Bioeconomy

General aspects of UNESP research on the theme

In 2014, exports of agricultural and forestry products, food, bioenergy, biotechnology and green chemistry reached $ 2 trillion corresponding to 13% of world trade, exceeding the 10% observed in 2007. These sectors are central to be achieved at least half of the sustainable development goals (SDG ́s) of the United Nations, including food security and ensuring access to energy and health.

On a global scale, developing the bioeconomy is essential in order to preserve and rebuild natural capital and improve the quality of life for a growing world population. For this, there is a set of goals to be achieved. 1) to stimulate collaboration between governments and researchers to optimize the use of resources and to share knowledge. 2) to find ways to measure the development of the bioeconomy and its contributions to the SDG ́s emphasis on priority goals, such as food safety. 3) the bioeconomy needs to be linked to multilateral policies and intergovernmental discussions including discussions by SDG ́s climate and biodiversity and economic policy agreements; in contrast, subsidies on fossil fuels reached an impressive $ $5.3 trillion, or 6.5% of global gross domestic product in 2015. 4) to define the necessary skills and to train human resources to think systemically and develop sustainable basic technologies for the bioeconomy; 5) to prioritize research and development on the subject.

Bioeconomics is the application of biotechnology, understood as the set of technologies based on biological systems, primary production, health and industry. The bioeconomy is based on three elements: 1) advanced knowledge of physiology, biochemistry, genes and complex cellular processes; 2) renewable biomass; 3) integration of biotechnology applications in all sectors to avoid waste, but coproducts of the productive chains. Developing Bioeconomy by following these principles is critical for energy, water and food security. There is no way to separate these four topics. Agriculture is the sector of the economy with higher water consumption (70% in global terms). In Brazil, about a quarter of energy is produced from biomasses and agricultural exports are the main generators of commercial supervision, fundamental for economic and social stability.

Goal – Bioeconomics and food sustainability


Description – Sustainable food production in Brazil aims to supply our population, but also plays a central role in the country’s economic and social stability. Agriculture and livestock are historically responsible for 1/4 of the country’s GDP, 1/3 of jobs and also constitute the main source of trade surplus in our country. Currently, world grain stocks are sufficient for just three months of consumption. It is necessary to increase current production of food in more than 60% by 2050. However, the cultivated area will increase by only 2%. The increase in production will depend on the increase of productivity by adapting crops (plants and animals) to environmental stresses. The scarcity of water deserves attention. According to the UN, about 70% of water consumed on the planet is destined to agriculture and it is expected to increase 19% by 2050. The biotic stresses will also be an important barrier to increased productivity and sustainability of production. Cases of resistance from pests, diseases and weeds are progressively more frequent. The proposals involve mainly the diagnosis of resistance, but the work with natural products can contribute to the solution to resistance problems by enlarging the set of mechanisms which could be explored. Equally challenging will be to develop and diffuse the technologies needed to increase the quality of the food produced in Brazil, considering all its complexity given the particularities of the various consumer markets with different cultural, genetic and age characteristics. Biotechnology certainly will have a role in sustainable food production. Among all 123 GMOs commercial Releases that occurred in Brazil, 83% are destined to agriculture and livestock. Nanotechnology and digital agriculture, in conjunction with biotechnology, will contribute to the effectiveness of studies of physiology, nutrition and genetic improvement and to the sustainable food production. The whole world needs the food produced here in Brazil. Brazil’s economic and social stability depends on increasing food production, which must be supported by increasing productivity, being sustainable and incorporating new quality attributes. Losses should be reduced. With these goals, we need to strengthen partnerships to qualify human resources and develop the technologies needed.

Bioeconomics and water sustainability

Description – Water is our most valuable economic, ecological and social resource. It is essential to preserve the natural cycles and biodiversity to generate energy and to support agricultural and industrial production. The retrieving and preservation of water resources are keys to both the expansion of the bioeconomy and to the production and sustainable development. The FAO estimates that two-thirds of the world’s population face water shortages and that agriculture accounts for 70% of the world consumption of water. The international day of water established by the UN has triggered society’s reflection on fundamental points for the sustainable use of this resource, for example: theme of 2018: Sharing Water; theme of 2015: Water and Sustainable Development; theme of 2014: Water and Energy; theme of 2012: Water and Food Security – The World Thirsts because We’re Hungry; theme of 2007: Dealing with Water Scarcity. In addition to meeting basic needs of the population in Brazil, water is essential to produce food, fibre and energy. About a quarter of the energy we consume is produced from biomass power plants and other 12.6% are produced by hydroelectric stations. Climate change and water scarcity can have a great impact on the national energy production. The World Economic Forum’s report of 2016 lists the rising price of energy, climate change and the water crisis among the five biggest risks that can impact the world in the coming years and decades. Human activities also interfere, directly or indirectly, with water quality. Hydric bodies have the capacity to assimilate human interferences and to auto purify, but this capacity is limited. In average terms, the UN esteems that for each liter of water used for the humanity, 10 liters end up polluted. The water quality preservation is essential for the agriculture activities. An analysis of the sector’s exports in 2012 indicates that a total of 228 billion cubic meters of water were consumed to produce them. This volume would be sufficient to supply 6.14 billion people with 100L per day for a period of one year. To design agricultural, cattle and forest production systems with lesser water consumption is essential to sustainably develop Brazil and its bioeconomics. The creation of the necessary solutions will demand the integration of knowledge in the fields of nanotechnology, biotechnology, genetics, physiology, ecology, digital numerical and farming analysis, for example.

Bioeconomics and circular economy

Description – Sustainable production of biomass has significantly contributed to Brazil’s climate and energy targets and it stands out for generating jobs in economically depressed areas. Sustainable biomass production associated with the concept of cascading biomass creates economically, socially and environmentally sustainable solutions. It is a priority to develop new uses of biomass for greater profitability and new approaches on how to produce them in a sustainable way, with less consumption of natural resources by applying concepts of waste hierarchy and cascade resources. Biomasses are the only renewable sources of carbon in thermal, biological or physical processes for various industrial purposes, especially when it comes to the production of biofuels. It has as characteristics and advantages: low cost and CO2 neutral balance; forest, agro-industrial, municipal and industrial residues can be used; easy storage; it is possible to develop closed cycles with recycling of nutrients; the possibility of a secondary fuel conversion for chemical engines, additives or special chemical products, as monomers. The exploration of biomasses promotes benefits as: 1) Generation of jobs and growth; 2) Resource efficiency – using cascade promotes multiple uses of raw materials, thereby reducing imports; 3) Circular economy – cascade preserves materials of higher value by extending product cycles; 4) Bioeconomy – the world doesn’t have bioeconomy without a diverse set of biological products, in addition to biofuels. Deploy the circular economy will require systemic change by abstracting the economic consumption growth. With renewable energy sources, the circular model builds economic, natural and social capital and is based on three principles: 1) to reduce waste and pollution; 2) to keep products and materials in use; 3) to regenerate natural systems. In a circular economy, economic activity builds and rebuilds the overall health of the system. The concept recognizes the necessity of the economy to work effectively in all the scales – for big and small companies, for organizations and individuals, globally and locally. The transition to a circular economy is not equivalent only to the adjustments intended to reduce the negative impacts of the linear economy. On the contrary, represents a systemic change that creates long-term resilience, generates trade and economic opportunities and provides environmental and social benefits.

Bioeconomics and energy sustainability


Description – In its report of 2016, the world economic forum listed the rise of energy prices as one of the five risks with greater potential of global impact in the next years. In Brazil, 43.5% of energy have renewable sources and more than a quarter of the energy is produced from biomass power plants, such as afforestation wood and coal; ethanol and electric power produced from sugar cane juice, bagasse and straw; biodiesel produced mainly from soybean oil. There is a great potential and need to increase the sustainable production of bioenergy in Brazil. Specifically in the case of ethanol, Brazil has become a product importer, mainly because of the difficulty in increasing the sugar-cane productivity. If the situation remains the same, Brazil will import 12% and 26% of the consumed ethanol in 2018 and 2023, respectively. The substitution of imports will require the expansion of the first and second generation ethanol production. Bioenergy integrates the bioeconomy. The application of the principles and the pursuit of the objectives already mentioned for the bioeconomy could bring great advances for the production of sustainable bioenergy. Our country is the one closest to having a sustainable bioenergy production model that can be exported to other countries. BIOEN programs for sustainable bioenergy production have set five research and development priorities: 1) Sustainable biomass production to produce bioenergy; 2) Technologies to transform biomass into biofuels; 3) Efficient use of biofuels in engines, boilers and industries; 4) Biofactories for biofuels production and co-products processing; 5) Economic, social and environmental sustainability of production chains. To make our energy matrix even more renewable, extending the participation of the energy generated from biomass, it is necessary to constantly produce innovations that guarantee and extend the competitive advantage of the bioenergy producing companies in Brazil. Innovations only happen if it has qualified human resources to propose and develop them. The solutions that are necessary to expand sustainable bioenergy production will require the development and integration of basic and applied knowledge related to the five themes listed by BIOEN, with emphasis on chemistry, physics, engineering, nanotechnology, biotechnology, genetics, physiology, ecology and digital agriculture.

Education

All partners of the Global Bioeconomy Alliance have a varied offer of degree programs in the field of bioeconomy. This refers to both Bachelor and Master programs. The following sites give an overview of the various study courses at TUMCS, UQ and UNESP.

One of the alliance`s main objectives for the near future is to intensify the educational exchange of students and staff between the partner universities.

Biotechnology

Biotechnology considers how cellular and biomolecular processes can address real-world current global challenges. We apply foundational and cutting-edge scientific skills to create innovative solutions to medical, agricultural, industrial and environmental problems. Central to this field are development of business skills to successfully commercialise new inventions to benefit the end user. Biotechnology is an exciting interdisciplinary subject, whether you have strength in chemistry, biology, physics or engineering, there is a track to suit everyone.

Bachelor of Biotechnology

Biotechnology is a creative entrepreneurial field, where scientists design innovative products and technologies, pioneering new frontiers in health, agriculture, science, engineering and beyond.

Develop the skills and knowledge needed to translate innovative scientific ideas into commercially viable solutions. Learn real-world insights from educators who are at the frontier of emerging research fields in biotechnology.

You will combine theory and practice to examine biotechnology’s varied applications, from antibody engineering to fight disease and genetic plant engineering to increase agricultural yields, through to vaccine design, cell and tissue culture technologies, and more.

Deepen your understanding of the key issues within biotechnology such as intellectual property, regulatory compliance, quality assurance and quality control. Learn to apply quality management systems in biotechnology so that products and technologies are safe and reproducible.

Learn how to assess the market potential and financial viability of new products or technical services such as vaccines, diagnostics, biopharmaceutical drugs, transgenic plants or innovations in stem cell therapy.

Majors

Agricultural Biotechnology
Cultivate innovative solutions to enhance the sustainability, productivity and profitability of the global agricultural industry. Study agricultural biotechnology and undertake advanced-level study in areas such as plant and food science, biochemistry, plant and animal molecular biology, and genetics. Learn how to genetically engineer crops or livestock animals to enhance nutritional value, reduce susceptibility to disease, improve sustainability and enable them to thrive in hostile environments.
Chemical and Nano Biotechnology

Nanotechnology is the ability to manipulate individual atoms, molecules and groups of molecules to form new chemical or particle structures needed for the development of new medicines, materials or technologies. You'll combine theory and practice to explore how nanotechnology underpins new innovations in modern medicine, technology and renewable energy.

Develop a comprehensive understanding of organic and inorganic chemistry, analytical techniques, alongside aspects of microbiology, biochemistry and pharmacology. Gain hands-on experience in gene editing, recombinant DNA technology, bioinformatics and genomics in our world-class laboratories and computer facilities.

Medical Biotechnology

Medical biotechnology uses cutting-edge tools and techniques to prevent, diagnose and treat current and emerging diseases. Though a combination of theory and practice, this study track will take you to the forefront of modern medicine.

You will learn how new therapeutics, diagnostic devices, wearable technologies and equipment are developed and used to accurately identify disease. You will examine how genetics underpins personalised medicine, leading to treatment tailored for the individual. Advance your knowledge of how therapies based on small molecules, biologics, stem cells and other technologies are identified, selected and developed through preclinical and clinical testing into market-ready therapeutics.

Molecular and Microbial Biotechnology

Advances in molecular and microbial biotechnology are revolutionising the way we live, providing healthier lifestyles and creating a more sustainable world. Molecular and microbial biotechnology involves transferring genetic information between human, plant or animal cells, or microscopic organisms to capitalise on existing biological processes to create new products or innovations.

It's an exciting field of science that combines applications from molecular biology, biochemistry, immunology, genetics and microbiology to create products and innovations in areas as diverse as human and animal health, agriculture, food and sustainable energy production, and textiles.

Synthetic Biology and Industrial Biotechnology

Get ready to pioneer new frontiers in health, food science, conservation and beyond.

Synthetic biology is transforming how we develop new medicines, enhance human nutrition and create a more sustainable world. It is a growing field of science that applies engineering design principles to chemistry, bioinformatics and genetics. These principles allow scientists to create or modify biological processes in living organisms and then develop new innovations across agriculture, health, energy production and environmental management.

Master of Biotechnology

The Master of Biotechnology program is designed for scientists who want to update their technical skills in core areas such as molecular biology, protein technology or bioinformatics, acquire research laboratory experience and translate their discoveries into market ready products. The program also suits legal or business professionals with some scientific background who want to learn about the latest technological developments.

You'll also have the opportunity to put your learning into practice through internships, placements and international study options that focus on research and development, commercialisation, marketing and the business of science.

Master of Biotechnology Research Extensive

The Master of Biotechnology Research Extensive program is designed for scientists who wish to increase their technical and research skills in core areas of biotechnology, and to obtain a more extended laboratory immersion than is available in the MBiotech.

Through an independent research project, you will increase your technical and research skills working with the university’s researchers and academics, or in an industry setting. You'll also have the opportunity to participate in internships, placements and international study.

Masters-level fields of study

Agricultural Biotechnology

Cultivate innovative solutions to enhance the sustainability, productivity and profitability of the global agricultural industry.

Learn how to meet environmental and food security challenges with gene editing, genomics, proteomics, recombinant DNA technology, bioinformatics and disease diagnostics.

You will develop multidisciplinary research and business skills needed to translate discoveries from the laboratory to real life.

Medical Biotechnology

Medical biotechnology uses cutting-edge tools and techniques to prevent, diagnose and treat, current and emerging diseases.

This field of study will allow you to be at the forefront of modern medicine. Learn about advanced biopharmaceuticals, cell labelling and tracking, stem cells, immunology, diagnostic devices, gene therapy, artificial organs and other aspects of innovative health solutions.

You will develop multidisciplinary research and business skills needed to translate discoveries from the laboratory to real life.

Synthetic Biology and Industrial Biotechnology

Get ready to pioneer new frontiers in health, food science, conservation and beyond.

Learn how to create and re-engineer biological processes in living organisms. Develop cleaner sources of agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, designer materials and other innovative products across agriculture, health, energy production and environmental management.

You will develop multidisciplinary research and business skills needed to translate discoveries from the laboratory to real life.